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There was an interesting example of persuasive technology on the Nudge blog the other day. Two design students from Stanford have designed a light switch that becomes harder to turn on when more appliances in the house are running (I think that's the right way round). "SmartSwitch" does this with a network connection (that sends it information about the current energy consumption of the house) and a brake pad (to provide the mechanical resistance). Here's a video of the prototype in action:

There was an interesting example of persuasive technology on the Nudge blog the other day. Two design students from Stanford have designed a light switch that becomes harder to turn on when more appliances in the house are running (I think that's the right way round). "SmartSwitch" does this with a network connection (that sends it information about the current energy consumption of the house) and a brake pad (to provide the mechanical resistance). Here's a video of the prototype in action:

The Nudge blog describes this as a nudge, but it's also a good example of persuasive technology. When viewed from the persuasive technology perspective, SmartSwitch uses elements of tunnelling (the home-owner decides to install the switches into his home and submits to their effect), suggestions (the switch only feels different when a lot of appliances are turned on - presumably the right time to intervene with a tactile message about energy consumption) and I suppose there's may also an element of operant conditioning there too.

SmartSwitch are an entry in Core77's Greener Gadget's design Competition. Find out more and vote for it here if you like it.

What do you think? Would you like this in your house?

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