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If, like me, you are the sort of person who would run a mile rather than listen to Woman's Hour on BBC Radio 4, take courage and think again. This week the programme is dramatising John Christopher's classic science-fiction thriller No Blade of Grass. (It's kind of John Wyndham on steroids: it also became a fairly dire movie). In it, an unknown virus wipes out all the west's staple crops, leaving Britain starving. The country quickly descends into murderous anarchy.

No Blade of GrassIf, like me, you are the sort of person who would run a mile rather than listen to Woman's Hour on BBC Radio 4, take courage and think again. This week the programme is dramatising John Christopher's classic science-fiction thriller No Blade of Grass. (It's kind of John Wyndham on steroids: it also became a fairly dire movie). In it, an unknown virus wipes out all the west's staple crops, leaving Britain starving. The country quickly descends into murderous anarchy.

It doesn't take a genius to work out why the apocalyptic meme is so strong right now. It's there in art, clearly, in movies and in BBC remakes like this and Survivors. Interestingly, just to underline the fact that the long cultural history of apocalyptic visions is not unrelated to our current environmental predicament, there's a new edition of the book being published, with an introduction from cultural historian and ecologist Robert MacFarlane.

Listen to the drama - this week only - on BBC's Listen Again here.

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