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In a pretty mammoth series of posts, Dan Lockton (a doctoral researcher at Brunel University's school of Engineering and Design) has published some of his research into "Design with Intent". Dan defines Design with Intent as design that intends to result in certain user behaviour, and suggests that Persuasive Technology (which the RSA's project is inspired by) can fit within this wider term.

In a pretty mammoth series of posts, Dan Lockton (a doctoral researcher at Brunel University's school of Engineering and Design) has published some of his research into "Design with Intent". Dan defines Design with Intent as design that intends to result in certain user behaviour, and suggests that Persuasive Technology (which the RSA's project is inspired by) can fit within this wider term.

The research he presents is fascinating for its inclusion of design from an exhaustive variety of fields - techniques from traffic management, public spaces, architecture, manufacturing, product, graphic and interior design, behavioural economics and psychology, as well as persuasive technology are included.

Dan presents techniques of designing for behaviour change that are grouped by six "lenses" - each providing a behaviour-changing worldview through which designers can look; the architectural lens, the errorproofing lens, the persuasive lens, the visual lens, the cognitive lens and the security lens.

More than examples however, Dan is working on a design methodology that helps designers choose techniques to either enable, motivate or constrain certain behaviours.

It's definitely worth a look for a good description of the ideas of persuasive technology, but I also like the examples from urban planning like the "slanty design" that prevents people leaving litter on top of cigarette bins, and the portion sizes of snacks from the errorproofing group.

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