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Later today I'll be putting up our own review of Steve Waters' new double-bill of plays about climate change The Contingency Plan, but in the meantime take theatre critic and environmental blogger's Robert Butler of the Ashden Directory's word forf it. These plays, he says, are "terrific".

Later today I'll be putting up our own review of Steve Waters' new double-bill of plays about climate change The Contingency Plan, but in the meantime take theatre critic and environmental blogger's Robert Butler of the Ashden Directory's word forf it. These plays, he says, are "terrific".

If there's one line I had to choose from The Contingency Plan, Steve Waters’s terrific new double-bill of plays about climate change, now on at the Bush Theatre in London, it's the moment when Will Paxton (Geoffrey Streatfeild), a young glaciologist, explains the concept of displacement to the new Tory minister for climate change. Having spelled out that ice is 'basically parked water', Will warily predicts that the enormous West Antarctic Ice Sheet may well melt (much like the smaller Larsen B ice shelf).

'But this is thousands of miles from us,' chuckles the smooth Old Etonian minister (David Bark-Jones), whose schoolfriend, David Cameron, has become prime minister. Will replies with patience, 'If you pour water in the bath, it doesn't stay under the tap.'

Read Robert Butler's review of The Contingency Plan at The Economist's Intelligent Life.

Read the Ashden Directory blog on The Contingency Plan.

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