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Via City Pollen, a video of Mircea Cantor's Monument for the end of the world, which the blogger came across as part of Modern Art Oxford's Transmission Interrupted (which continues until June 21.) And for City Pollen it raises an interesting questions. Why are public spaces dominated by thoughts of the past, not the future?

Via City Pollen, a video of Mircea Cantor's Monument for the end of the world, which the blogger came across as part of Modern Art Oxford's Transmission Interrupted (which continues until June 21.) And for City Pollen it raises an interesting questions. Why are public spaces dominated by thoughts of the past, not the future?

Via a meditation on Italo Calvino's Invisible Cities, the artwork raises a question in City Pollen's mind: "How distorted it is that our cities build monument after monument to the dead or to commemorate past events in war and culture, and yet we make no space at all for the future? Wouldn’t it be beautiful if every city had such a space, a place where we could think about lives to come?... We tend to see ourselves as the end point of history, and this makes sense in terms of our knowledge, life spans and the necessity of repressing thoughts of death. But to acknowledge that our homes are homes of people to come could be powerful and positive. Today’s cultural short-sightedness sets us stumbling into a bleak future, but human imaginations make our cultures endlessly malleable."

All of which goes some way to explain why Battle of Britain pilot Keith Park getting the Fourth Plinth for six months is such a betrayl of a hard-won space for the artists' imagination.

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