Accessibility links

How glad I was to have wriggled out of sailing a 24' Mersey Mylne (for all its superior design virtues) off Rockferry on Saturday as I heard and watched Gryff Rys-Jones liken the quality of Mersey under the standard grey firmament to "the colour of dead rat". This as he prepared to dive in and swim the river as part of his rather excellent investigation into the industrial-historic waterways of the North West; with many passing compliments to the craftsmen of culvert and causeway, aqueduct and bridge, hydro-powered cascade and indeed wholy re-engineered landscape (Chatsworth).

How glad I was to have wriggled out of sailing a 24' Mersey Mylne (for all its superior design virtues) off Rockferry on Saturday as I heard and watched Gryff Rys-Jones liken the quality of Mersey under the standard grey firmament to "the colour of dead rat". This as he prepared to dive in and swim the river as part of his rather excellent investigation into the industrial-historic waterways of the North West; with many passing compliments to the craftsmen of culvert and causeway, aqueduct and bridge, hydro-powered cascade and indeed wholy re-engineered landscape (Chatsworth).

In fact I'd just got off the train from my home town where I finally got around to taking the official tour of St Geroge's Hall. Awestruck, obviously, by the high Victorian classicism and proud of my city forebears for getting it up, one fact pre-occupies me in its contemporary correlative. In the first heyday of this municiple facility, we learned, the upper gallery of the massive greatl hall (that of the great Willis organ and rarely-revealed Minton floor) was accessible to the poor for a penny so they could keep warm. Keep warm and observe the gaudies below. Imagine today getting access to the upper gallery of the Guildhall or Bouji's to bask in the warm glow of wealth and vainglory.

Comments

Be the first to write a comment

Please login to post a comment or reply.

Don't have an account? Click here to register.