Accessibility links

Everyone loves a good graph, so I wanted to post about the New York Times' visualisation of the 2008 US Time survey (which asks people to write down how they spent their time). It's nicely interactive, letting you isolate sections of the community by sex, employment status, race, age, education and whether they have children and shows you what a proportion of those sections were actually getting up to during an average 24 hour period. For example, it tells me that at 8:10am (the same time as I'm writing this from the train) that I'm joined by 7% of all Americans who are also travelling. The largest proportion (25%) at that time are working, closely followed by the 24% that are sensibly still in bed.

us Everyone loves a good graph, so I wanted to post about the New York Times' visualisation of the 2008 US Time survey (which asks people to write down how they spent their time). It's nicely interactive, letting you isolate sections of the community by sex, employment status, race, age, education and whether they have children and shows you what a proportion of those sections were actually getting up to during an average 24 hour period. For example, it tells me that at 8:10am (the same time as I'm writing this from the train) that I'm joined by 7% of all Americans who are also travelling. The largest proportion (25%) at that time are working, closely followed by the 24% that are sensibly still in bed.

As well as being generally interesting, this sort of data has special value when designing for behaviour change. What environments are people likely to be in - a train carriage, an office, a pub, at home? What products and services are people likely to be interacting with - a computer, a television, a microwave?

Although the Times' visualisation has attracted a bit of interest on twitter and in various blogs, I haven't seen many people mention the earlier and very similar Tokyo Tuesday. Tokyo Tuesday presented the Japanese Survey on Time Use and Leisure Activities in a similar interactive format:

japan

And in case you're wondering, the UK's ONS did carry out a dedicated Time Use survey in 2000, and included a time use diary in the 2005 Omnibus survey. A comparison between these shows very little change in activities over those five years, but less time on average was spent eating and drinking, washing and dressing, doing housework, reading and participating in sport, with more time was spent sleeping and resting, looking after children in the household, socialising and participating in hobbies and games. Here's a graph to complete the trio:

uk

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