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I'm putting together some ideas for a short pamphlet on behaviour change policy and designers (mostly service and product designers I suppose). Here's a precis:

I'm putting together some ideas for a short pamphlet on behaviour change policy and designers (mostly service and product designers I suppose). Here's a precis:

Civil servants, politicians and their advisors have been fascinated to hear how knowledge from psychology can give insights that may lead to more effective ways to encourage people to change their behaviour. How to use such knowledge to generate policy options is a different question, and developing behaviour change interventions could be risky. These risks may be mitigated by adopting working practices more usually found in the creative industries than Whitehall and Westminster.

What I'm trying to say is that politicians, political advisors and civil servants interested in the effect of social proof and other nudges lack a process that allows them to move from this theoretical knowledge to putting such insights into practice in a way that is fun, transparent and effective.

From my perspective, I think that design could contribute a lot to this discourse - especially designers' ability to come up with creative ideas, their reliance on social research and their experience in co-design and social prototyping.

I'd love to know what you think - do drop me a comment.

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