Accessibility links

Ed Miliband in his leaders speech at this week’s Labour Party conference spoke of  a new way of doing things, a new kind of  ethic, the nature of which would alter behaviour from the top to the bottom of society. This kind of aspiration seems to characterise most of the conversations I am hearing and having over the last few months.

Ed Miliband in his leaders speech at this week’s Labour Party conference spoke of  a new way of doing things, a new kind of  ethic, the nature of which would alter behaviour from the top to the bottom of society. This kind of aspiration seems to characterise most of the conversations I am hearing and having over the last few months.

In Peterborough through Citizen Power, we are exploring ways of tackling public sector reform that would impact upon a mind-set change – all involved speak of this as taking place over a generation. I must say that I am relieved that there seems to be more appreciation of genuine change taking time. Of course, epiphanies, revelations, new ways of working can happen overnight but embedding them in collective efforts is a subtle and long term process. At least I think so and was reminded of this when I attended last weekend, the final get together of all those who have been involved in the Creative Partnerships programme over the last 9 years.

During the programme, there was a huge effort to make the case for how creative learning and creative approaches to whole school change transformed children’s learning and informed teaching practice. Indeed, internationally this has been recognised time and time again, most recently in the awarding of the WISE award in 2011 for educational innovation. However, where is the research now that the impact over time could be assessed? Surely this is the moment to take stock of where all that effort went now that the party is over. What happened next for those learners and teachers and schools? Was there an impact that outlasted the intervention? What about the impact on the practice of all those arts (and other) practitioners who were also encouraged to work in new ways? What about the arts institutions? I know from the area I ran in north London that we created and strengthened many new networks and I’d love to know how they survived. I will only know if our work was effective if there are traces of it later on.  It was always meant to be about sustainability but if we don’t examine the aftermath, we will have lost the argument that it really changed very much.

This is just one of many interventions that suffer from the lack of a long term commitment - seeing it through. I hope that government funding for transformative initiatives can see its way to a new kind of ethic as Mr. Miliband suggests and that the ambition for transformative change is also realised through how we conceive and fund the projects that make it happen.

Comments

Be the first to write a comment

Please login to post a comment or reply.

Don't have an account? Click here to register.