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Today's launch of the ippr's Condition of Britain report coincided (I'll assume by accident) with the Centre for Policy Studies launch of The Policy. The fixture clash reminded me of my ex-colleague Temi's Ogunye's brilliant article for The Independent, arguing that 'The left can be too clever for its own good. We need to translate think tank speak into plain English'. Contrast these two reports:

Condition of Britain: "This landmark report argues for a new approach to politics and public action driven by the goals of spreading power, fostering contribution and strengthening shared institutions." 

The Policy: Abolish corporation tax for small companies; abolish capital gains tax for investors in small companies.

Condition of Britain: 28 recommendations

The Policy: 2 recommendations (see above)

This is probably an unfair comparison; the ippr's report was deliberately wide-ranging and systematic, capturing the concerns of thousands. The CPS idea came from Maurice Saatchi, one of their trustees, underpinned by a small amount of empirical data. So I won't take this comparison further (especially as I haven't read either report properly).

Matthew Taylor's blog gives a deeper analysis of the strengths and flaws in the Condition of Britain approach and Ed Miliband's response. With a football match to get home to, all I'll say now is that every party's commitment to localism (and attitude to local authorities within that commitment) needs severe and forensic stress-testing before anyone should believe any of it. Which precise powers are you prepared to give away, to who, and for how long? What rights of redress or re-centralisation will you retain? Otherwise, as I wrote in my last blog recommending that all Lib Dem ministers resign this summer, 'whoever is in office, the centralisers are in power'.


Image courtesy of Cherry Red Records

Joe Hallgarten is Director of Education at the RSA. @joehallg



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