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Through their partnership with RSA creating the ‘Evidence Champions Network’, Curious Minds been strengthening the evidence base that demonstrates what many instinctively know; that arts and culture has the power to support young people to thrive.

The arts and culture sector have long known that some young people have less opportunity to engage with their work. It’s perhaps been of some solace to know that, at a minimum, school has been a universal point of access to arts and culture for most.

However, as entries for arts GCSE subjects dropped yet another 10% in 2017/18, Curious Minds thinks it’s time to consider more carefully who is in danger of missing out completely, and what else can be done to ensure arts and culture continue to play an important role in children and young people’s lives.

Through their partnership with RSA and their assistance in driving the ‘Evidence Champions Network’, they have been strengthening the evidence base that demonstrates what many instinctively know; that arts and culture has the power to support young people to thrive. Curious Minds strongly believe that access to culture is so much more than an entitlement; it can enable young people to change their life circumstances.

Children and young people face many challenges as they navigate their way through school and home life. Social mobility, class, poverty, issues around mental health and well-being, discrimination of many kinds may all combine to hinder a child’s flourishing.

Curious Minds would love you to join them to discuss these issues at ‘The Thriving Child In The North’ conference, which will take place on the 28th of June at The Lowry in Salford. It is one of several simultaneous conferences taking place across the UK, led by the Royal Opera House.

They will examine these issues from a range of perspectives and ask how else stakeholders could harness the power of arts and culture. The audience will hear speakers livestreamed from the Royal Opera House including Darren Chetty (teacher, writer and researcher) and Akala (rapper, journalist, author and founder of The Hip Hop Shakespeare Company). The speakers and panel members who will join at The Lowry will bring a uniquely northern focus via a range of professionals working directly with children and young people facing challenging life circumstances. The northern conference will also include a ‘reverse panel’, giving young people the opportunity to put their questions to delegates.

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