Projects to make workplaces more period-friendly and plans to turn oilrigs into kelp farms amongst the 2022 RSA Student Design Awards winners

Press release

Today (Thursday 16 June) The Royal Society for Arts, Manufacturers and Commerce (RSA) announces the eleven winners of this year’s Student Design Awards.

The awards ceremony takes place in London on Wednesday 29th June.

Winning designs this year include an inclusive campaign for managers to create better working conditions for people on their period and personalised antihistamine microneedle patches that eradicate the need for pill packets, producing 98% less waste.

Also amongst the winners is a proposal to convert decommissioned oil rigs into large-scale sustainable kelp farms and a digital interactive space that celebrates Romani people. 

The winners come from undergraduate courses across the UK including Imperial College, Sheffield Hallam, Nottingham Trent and Loughborough.

Andy Haldane, the RSA’s Chief Executive Officer said: “These awards represent the very best of what the RSA is about: Finding and empowering talented young people, helping to showcase their vision and using the power of the RSA to supercharge their efforts.

“Huge congratulations are due to all the winners – they join the ranks of some of the greatest designers in modern memory. There are some seriously impressive ideas in the mix this year, and it will be very exciting to see how the prize money will help take them to the next level.”

The RSA’s Student Design Awards are in their 98th year making them the world’s longest running awards for design.

Previous winners include Sir Jony Ive, Former Chief Design Officer of Apple; Richard Clarke, Former Head of Innovation at Nike; and Bill Moggridge, designer of the first laptop.  

This year judges included Nerys Anthony, Director of Youth Programmes and Innovation, The Children’s Society; Frank Anatole, Principal Architect, Network Rail and Valerio De Vivo, Head of Transformation, LEGO Design. 

A full list of winners and images of the winning designs is available here.

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