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Making remote work good work

Video

  • Future of Work
  • Employment

Covid-19 brought with it a mass global experiment in working from home. And with the results now in, 2020 looks set to be the year that changed office life forever.

Pandemic lockdown forced companies worldwide into a crash course in remote working. For many, it was a bumpy ride at first. But six months in, the data shows a remarkably swift and widespread adaptation to new working practices, cultures and technologies. In a recent survey, over three quarters of UK CEOs said home working is here to stay, with greater flexibility, digital transformation and lower density office space, all set to become permanent features of the future of work.

With work now increasingly what we do, rather than a place we go, leaders face new challenges to ensure remote work is good work for all.

How do we maximise the gains while attending to growing concerns around employee health and wellbeing, inclusion and equity? Who wins and who loses from WFH?

Bruce Daisley is one of the world's most influential voices on fixing work. He joins RSA US Director Alexa Clay for an essential briefing on the great remote working experiment: what we learned, and how to prepare wisely for what comes next.

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