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What's next for black British women?

Video

  • Arts and society
  • Gender
  • Social justice

Most black women are still not being heard in Britain today. And those who do speak out are often punished for using their voices. How do we take up a seat at the table and speak on our own terms?

Black women’s experience is now moving from the private to the public sphere, bringing with it new opportunities and challenges for those on the frontline of change.

Following on from the acclaimed Slay in Your Lane, timely new anthology Loud Black Girls invites a new generation of writers, artists and activists to explore the richness and variety of what it means to exist as a black woman in a turbulent political age.

At a time when black women find themselves increasingly courted, and yet continuously minoritised and stereotyped, essayists Paula Akpan, Jendella Benson and Kuba Shand-Baptiste join leadership coach and equality campaigner Michelle Moore to explore how to navigate an uncertain terrain while staying true to your values. How to wield influence with authenticity. How to own your history, your narrative, your work. How to empower your community and carry the torch forward for others.

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